Mentor for Startup Weekend Bintulu

I’m very honored to be one of the mentors for the first ever Startup Weekend organized in Bintulu. This event is made possible by Techstars, Google for Startups, Tabung Ekonomi Gagasan Anak Bumiputera Sarawak (TEGAS), Grab, Sarawak Multimedia Authority (SMA), MaGIC, University Putra Malaysia (UPM) Bintulu Campus and The Founders Club.

My role during this event was to check out the progress of the teams and question them on every aspect of their startup ideas. This would make them think deeper and take their idea further into the next level. I also shared some of my experience in regard to product design, marketing and most importantly — everything about startup. Hopefully this have inspired them and changed their perspective.

I also met a ton of awesome people from all over the country, such as the guys from the Founders Club, MaGIC, and even senior lecturers from University Putra Malaysia (UPM). Most importantly, I’ve met so many people who are passionate with their startup ideas and this is really unprecedented in Bintulu!

Hopefully this event (and other events that are similar) can be carried out more frequently in Bintulu so that we can help more people to build their startups, at the same time enhancing the startup ecosystem for Bintulu.

View Debug Messages on Android

If you’re currently developing any android apps, you might be wondering how to check debug messages when running the apps on a physical device. Android SDK actually comes with an utility called Logcat, which does exactly that.

If you’re running Eclipse IDE and it is not showing any debug messages, your Eclipse is probably not linked to the Logcat. You can set it up by going to:

Window -> Show View -> Other… -> Android -> LogCat

However, if you’re running other development tools that don’t support this feature (such as Unity Engine), you can fire up Logcat manually by using the command pad/terminal.

On Windows, you need to enter the (android sdk folder)\platform-tools folder before calling Logcat:

cd C:\android-sdk-windows\platform-tools

After that, you can call Logcat by first calling the ADB (Android Debug Bridge) and launch Logcat from it, like so:

adb logcat

However, if you’re just calling adb logcat you may see the terminal going crazy by showing tons of debug texts in crazy speed. This is because the Logcat is actually displaying debug texts of ALL the processes running on your device. You definitely do not want that, don’t you?

You can add an extra parameter behind the command which filters out the process list and only display your app. For example, if your app is built using Unity Engine, you can call:

adb logcat -s Unity

…which looks like this on the terminal:

That’s all. You can now easily debug your app and know exactly what’s going when bugs occur. Happy debugging!