Gigabyte BRIX (Intel NUC) GB-XM12-3227 Review

So… the other day I bought this Gigabyte BRIX barebone which is basically an Intel NUC system, but manufactured by Gigabyte. I’ve tried the vanilla Intel NUC systems before and it worked great, except the older generation which had over-heating issue but resolved after adding a thermal pad to it as well as a firmware upgrade, but overall still pretty okay I guess.

Now, back to Gigabyte BRIX, specifically the GB-XM12-3227 model. I can’t talk about the other models as I have never used it before, so let’s just stick to this one.

All-and-all, it worked fine at first. It booted up Windows 10 without any problem, HDMI connected to the monitor without any problem, great resolution, etc. UNTIL I tried to use the web browser. Even though the internet status is “connected”, I still couldn’t use the damn internet on my browser.

After hours and hours of research and trials, I realized that the issue is the firmware. Not only it’s old (from 2013), but it’s supposedly for Windows 8.1, and not Windows 10. Went to Gibabyte’s website to look for the latest drivers, and guess what, they only have firmware updates up to 2014, so still, no Windows 10 support.

Further more, I downloaded the latest BIOS and tried to flash it, only to realize the BIOS utility doesn’t support 64-bit Windows, because it is a god-damn Windows XP Service Pack 2 executable file!

Then, I went to Windows 10’s Device Manager and check out my wireless network adapter’s properties. This is when I realized the WiFi adapter only supports up to IEEE 802.11b/g and not the newer IEEE 802.11b/g/n, which unfortunately is what I set on my router. So then I moved over to my router’s admin page and changed the Transmission Mode to the appropriate setting.

I have no idea what’s causing this. Outdated BIOS? Outdated drivers? I have no idea.

However, despite able to connect to the internet now, the speed is still very limited. Often time it took roughly 20 seconds or more just to load a web page.

Then, I used a Chinese software called 360安全卫士 (translated as “360 Safety Guard”) and went to the “Optimization and Speed-up” page. That particular page contains an automated scan-and-fix feature which includes “network speed-up” option.

After running the optimization process, my wireless network is finally back to usable state! What sorcery is that?? (However, IEEE 802.11b/g/n is still not supported).

Overall, the Gigabyte BRIX works okay except the BIOS and drivers are really outdated and urgently need an update. That’s all for today, have a nice day folks.

Application Development with Qt Creator Second Edition

Application Development with Qt Creator Second Edition” is the 3rd book I reviewed for Packt Publishing. Although it’s the second edition, the contents of the book are greatly varied from its predecessor.

First off, it has more chapters compare to the first edition, bringing more contents to the readers especially topics related to Qt Quick. The book also included some pretty fun projects for readers to work on such as media player and simple paint program.

The book also covers some of the fundamental and important topics such as localization, software optimization, and debugging which are needed to develop industry-standard applications.

Let’s take a look at the chapter outline:

Chapter 1
Getting Started with Qt Creator, shows you how to download and install Qt Creator as well as edit simple applications to test your installation.

Chapter 2
Building Applications with Qt Creator, shows you how to compile, run, and debug your application using Qt Creator. You will learn how Qt Creator integrates with both the GNU debugger and the Microsoft console debugger to provide breakpoints, memory inspection, and other debugging help.

Chapter 3
Designing Your Application with Qt Designer, shows you how to use the drag-and-drop GUI designer that is a part of Qt Creator to build both Qt Widget-based applications and Qt Quick applications.

Chapter 4
Qt Foundations, takes you through the foundations of software development using Qt and also covers its support for platform-agnostic application development.

Chapter 5
Developing Applications with Qt Widgets, shows you how to build applications using Qt Widgets that look and act like native desktop applications on the platform of your choice.

Chapter 6
Drawing with Qt, shows the various ways you can move beyond the built-in controls in Qt and make your own drawing on the screen and other drawable entities such as image files in PNG or JPEG.

Chapter 7
Doing More with Qt Quick, expands on what you learned about Qt Quick in the introductory chapters.

Chapter 8
Multimedia and Qt Quick, introduces you to Qt Quick’s support for multimedia, such as audio and video playback as well as how to use a camera if it is connected.

Chapter 9
Sensors and Qt Quick, shows you how to use the various sensors on many of the devices available today using Qt Quick.

Chapter 10
Localizing Your Application with Qt Linguist, shows you how to manage resource strings for different locales, letting you build your application with different languages in different locales.

Chapter 11
Optimizing Performance with Qt Creator, shows you how to use Qt Creator to examine your Qt Quick application’s runtime performance, as well as how to perform the memory profiling of your application with Valgrind, an open source diagnostic tool.

Chapter 12
Developing Mobile Applications with Qt Creator, gives you a glimpse of the exciting arena of mobile software development and shows you how you can use what you’ve learned in this book about Qt and Qt Creator to write applications for platforms such as Google Android.

Chapter 13
Qt Tips and Tricks, is packed with tricks for using Qt and Qt Creator that will help you use the Qt framework and the Qt Creator IDE efficiently.

You can get the book from here.