LANManager Supports UNET

Surprisingly, the plugin I made for Unity called LANManager supports UNET out of the box. The plugin was made in last year, before Unity rolling out their new networking system called UNET, which is a complete remake from scratch.

LANManager is a Unity plugin that helps to propagate your Unity-based game throughout the local network and allows other clients to discover the game server automatically without the need to manually insert the server’s IP address.

The plugin seems to work fine without any modification to the code, except a small change is required for the sample project to run on the latest Unity – replace the Network View component attached on the character prefab with the Network Transform component and that’s it.

The reason why it still work is mainly because Unity didn’t change much of the abstraction layer, except the underlying architecture which is not exposed to the users. Event names such as OnConnectedToServer, OnPlayerConnected, etc. remain the same so it didn’t break any of the functions in LANManager. Good job to the engineers at Unity Technologies!

Old Project – 3D Level Editor (2010)

Today I stumbled upon some old screenshots in my backup folder and I thought maybe I should post it here to remind myself how passionate I was.

This is a 3D level editor I did for my hobby game project back in 2010. The level editor was made using Qt 4 and Irrlicht engine. Some of the screenshots below are showing the editor which uses Irrlicht’s native GUI. Irrlicht’s GUI system was quite limited in term of types of widgets and functionality, which later on led me to switching all the GUI over to Qt.

Some of the features supported by the “game engine” I did back then include:
– Basic fixed function 3D rendering
– Basic collision (box collider and trigger)
– Spawn points
– Player camera and animated camera (for in-game cinematic)
– 3D sound (using irrKlang)
– Simple path finding

I made a simple game demo using the game engine and level editor I made. Unfortunately, the game wasn’t finished and I moved on doing something else. Below is the video recording I did back in 2010 showing how the game demo look like, for a competition. Spore Motions was the name of our team back then.

Hopefully I will be back into game development very soon.

Building a Game with Unity and Blender

I am proud to announce that I have published my very first book! The book is entitled “Building a Game with Unity and Blender” and it’s published by Packt Publishing, a well-known publisher based in Birmingham, UK.

You can get a copy of the book directly from Packt Publishing or you can also order one from Amazon.

I would like to thank all the people who helped to make this possible. Thanks again!

UPDATE: The source files are now available. Download it here.

Minimal Qt Project

Today I was trying to experiment on how small can a Qt project get if I only use the essential modules and scrap away all the rest.

First I created a new Qt project by going to:
File -> New File or Project… -> Application -> Qt Widgets Application

When I build the new project I’m getting this empty window, which is expected:

Then I did the following:

1. Delete mainwindow.ui
2. Delete mainWindow.h and mainWindow.cpp
3. In main.cpp, remove QApplication and replace it with QGuiApplication instead.
4. Use QWindow instead of QMainWindow

The reason why I removed QApplication and QMainWindow is because they both rely on QtWidget module. This way we can reduce the size further by removing one more dependency. Now all I left are just 2 file: Myproject.pro and main.cpp, and they now look like this:

MyProject.pro

TARGET = MyProject
TEMPLATE = app
SOURCES += main.cpp

main.cpp

#include <QGuiApplication>
#include <QWindow>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    QGuiApplication app(argc, argv);
    QWindow window;
    window.setTitle("Hello World!");
    window.resize(640, 480);
    window.show();

    return app.exec();
}

Then I build the project again, which the result should look totally the same as before. However, we no longer need QtWidget.dll anymore which reduces the number of DLL files to just 5:

– libgcc_s_dw2-1.dll
– libstdc++-6.dll
– libwinpthread-1.dll
– Qt5Core.dll
– Qt5Gui.dll

The total size of entire executable folder, including all the DLL files mentioned above, is now only 11.3MB. Its still fairly large if compare to other application framework, but considering two things:

1. There are tons of functionalities in QtCore and QtGui alone, including all the helper classes and even OpenGL
2. All the DLL files in the entire Qt SDK is at the staggering size of 1.87GB in total

11.3MB is actually pretty damn impressive!